Day 80: On Target! Decimal Style

20140203-153214.jpgPlaying On Target! with 4th grade students yesterday inspired me to play with my 6th grade students today. However, my 6th graders’ target number was 10. Players rolled a 0-9 die five times, arranged the digits to create two decimal numbers so that their sum was as close to the target as possible. After playing an eight-round game, players arranged the digits to create two decimal numbers so that their difference was as far from the target as possible.

(Yes, I know that I’m way behind on my blog. This post is from January 9!)

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Day 79: Targeting 2500

20140203-150651.jpg On Target! is perfect for practice for any concept, with estimation and strategy thrown in for good measure. In this variation, played with a class of 4th graders, the target was 2500. Players select 4 cards from the deck (1o’s and face cards removed) and arrange them to create two 2-digit numbers, so that the product is as close to the target as possible.

By the way, notice the array models! I’m so proud of my teachers for incorporating this strategy into their multiplication unit.

(Yes, I know that I’m way behind on my blog. This post is from January 8!)

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Day 78: More of the Same

Screenshot 2014-02-03 16.55.55My 5th grade advanced math students continued to solve The Candy Shoppe problem. While most are progressing beautifully through, the greatest challenge has been expressing the solution clearly and precisely.

My 6th grade math students worked on task cards for addition and subtraction with decimals. While many progressed beautifully through, the greatest challenge was multi-step problems, particularly recognizing that there were several pieces to the problem.

(Yes, I know that I’m way behind on my blog. This post is from January 7!)

 

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Day 77: Decimal Number Scavenger Hunt

photo 3Where do you find decimal numbers?

What are they used for?

On Thursday, we had brainstormed a variety of applications for decimal numbers. Through discussion, my 6th graders concluded that decimal numbers are used to measure length, width, height, depth, time, temperature, speed, distance, volume, mass, and money. Students were then asked to search their homes for a variety examples and photograph them. After sharing their pictures, the data was used to write some basic addition and subtraction with decimal problems.

(Yes, I know that I’m way behind on my blog. This post is from January 6!)

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Day 76: Snow Day

20140203-150159.jpgThere is nothing like ending an already shortened week (New Year’s Day) with a Snow Day!

(Yes, I know that I’m way behind on my blog. This post is from January 3!)

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Day 75: The Candy Shoppe

Candy ShoppeDuring the summer I took Jo Boaler’s online course How to Learn Math. It was incredible. One of the assignments was to revise a problem or activity to make it more open. The result was The Candy Shoppe Problem.

By no means a stroke of genius, this problem was a start for me. And, it was the opportunity for my advanced 5th grade students to see, once again, that a problem does not always have one answer.

(Yes, I know that I’m way behind on my blog. This post is from January 2!)

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Day 74: Conspiracy Theory

Hot Dog 02“Why do we need to know the greatest common factor and least common mulitple? When are we going to use it?” asks one of my 5th grade advanced students.

My response. “Don’t you know about the hot dog and hot dog bun conspiracy?”

Their response. Confused looks and raised eyebrows.

I continue. “Did you know that hot dogs come in packages of 10 and buns in packages of 8? What if you are making a barbeque and want to have an equal number of hot dogs and buns.

Their response. “Ohhhh.”

With their curiosity peaked, we commenced a conversation about the application of the greatest common factor and the least common multiple in the real world. Through reading and sorting word problems, students drew conclusions about the situations in which these concepts were applied (i.e. GCF when dividing things into smaller groups or sections or arranging into rows, LCM when an event is repeating or purchasing the same amount).

(Yes, I know that I’m way behind on my blog. This post is from December 31!)

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